Opening of Re-created Burra Cheer Up Hall

Around twenty people gathered in the Mary Warnes Room at the Burra Town Hall last Wednesday (May 18)  for the opening of the re-created Burra Cheer-Up Hall, an initiative of the Burra History Group in line with the ANZAC Centenary Programme.

The group were welcomed and an introductory talk was given by Eric Fuss explaining the history of the Cheer-Up Society in both Adelaide and Burra.

Don Lloyd gave a talk about his family’s connections with the Society and his sisters Claire and Mary and cousin Aileen cut ribbons to officially open the room.

The occasion was enjoyed by all present who were keen to hear about the history and view the display.

Cheer Up open day

Guests present at the opening enjoyed hearing about the history of the Burra Cheer-Up Sociaty and viewing the displays.

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Siblings Don Lloyd and Claire Tiver at the opening of the re-created Cheer-Up Hall.
Claire is dressed as her mother (Annie May Morgan) would have looked as a member of the Burra Cheer-Up mounted girls.

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Cousins Aileen Rolley and Mary White at the opening. Both of their mothers were members of the Cheer-up mounted girls. They both cut a ribbon to open the exhibition.

 

Burra Cheer-Up Society 1915-1920

In line with the national ANZAC Centenary programme WW1 1914-1918, The Burra History Group recreated the Burra Cheer-Up Hall in the Mary Warnes Room at the Burra Town Hall.

Burra’s branch of the society was the first country branch formed in May 1915.

The principal objective of the Burra branch was to see that no local volunteer left without a farewell social and small gift, and later that no returning volunteer arrived home without a welcome at the station followed by a social at the Cheer-Up Hall. Members also made and dispatched woollen socks, khaki handkerchiefs, and other small items to the front line. Christmas packages were a specialty and included puddings and cigarettes.

They were also very active in supporting other of the town’s patriotic societies in numerous fund raising events.

 

Guests present at the opening enjoyed hearing about the history of the Burra Cheer-Up Sociaty and viewing the displays.

The Adelaide Cheer-Up Society had a hut on the present Festival Centre site at which soldiers on leave could relax and be entertained without resorting to hotels. Burra contributed largely to the cost of this and, as a consequence, the main hall of the hut was named Burra Hall.

 

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